Catching COVID in first, second trimester won’t harm baby – study

Catching COVID in first, second trimester won’t harm baby – study, The study followed 55 women who contracted coronavirus during their first or second trimester of pregnancy to evaluate fetal well-being, growth and placental function, among other related factors.

Babies born to women who contracted COVID-19 in the first and second trimesters are just as healthy as any other babies, a new Israeli study shows. In the third trimester though there is a higher risk of severe maternal disease and complications which can put expecting mothers in the intensive care unit and lead to preterm labor.

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“Fetal and Perinatal Outcome Following First and Second Trimester COVID-19 Infection: Evidence from a Prospective Cohort Study” was published earlier this month in the peer-reviewed Journal of Clinical Medicine.

According to the paper’s lead researcher, Prof. Yoav Yinon, head of Fetal Medicine Unit, Obstetrics and Gynecology at Sheba Medical Center, “there were no pregnancy complications, no fetal growth restrictions, no placenta complications. It was very reassuring.”

The study followed 55 women who contracted coronavirus during their first or second trimester of pregnancy to evaluate fetal well-being, growth and placental function, among other related factors. Amniocentesis was conducted and the fluid assessed for the virus. In addition, fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging was done sometime between weeks 30 and 32 of gestation.

“None of the fetuses exhibited signs of central nervous system disease, growth restriction and placental dysfunction,” the report said, adding that all the babies survived and were born full-term.

Moreover, there was no evidence of vertical transmission, meaning the mothers did not pass the virus through the placenta to the babies.

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Earlier this year, there were two cases of stillborn babies delivered in Israel who were found to have contracted coronavirus from their mothers. Yinon said such situations are very rare and international statistics show this occurs in 1% or less cases.

However, Yinon told The Jerusalem Post that despite the positive report, pregnant women should still be sure to get vaccinated against coronavirus. That’s because there is a higher risk of severe maternal disease and complications in the third trimester, which can put expecting mothers in the intensive care unit and lead to preterm labor.

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